Complementary and Social Currencies

Towards Monetary Pluralism
Wednesday December 4, 2013

This event explores the historical and contemporary evolution and function of complementary and social currencies, and their political and economic implications.

Overview

This event explores the historical and contemporary evolution and function of complementary and social currencies, and their political and economic implications. Questions to be addressed include:

What are complementary and social currencies?

How do complementary and social currencies differ in design and function?

What are the strengths and weaknesses of complementary and social currencies vis-a-vis state currencies and financial markets?

How have complementary and social currencies been used to achieve different political and economic objectives?

Participants

Speakers:

Participant Profile

Bernard Lietaer

Research Fellow
Center for Sustainable Resources of the University of California at Berkeley.

Bernard Lietaer is an international expert in the design and implementation of currency systems. He has studied and worked in the field of money for more than thirty years in a broad range of capacities: as a central banker, fund manager, university professor, and consultant to numerous governments, multinational corporations, and community organizations. He co-designed and implemented the convergence mechanism to the single European currency system (the Euro) and served as president of the Electronic Payment System at the National Bank of Belgium (the Belgian Central Bank). He co-founded and managed GaiaCorp, a top performing currency fund whose profits funded investments in environmental projects. A former professor of International Finance at the University of Louvain, he has also taught at Sonoma State University and Naropa University. He is currently a Research Fellow at the Center for Sustainable Resources of the University of California at Berkeley. You can follow Lietaer on his Website, Facebook and Twitter.

Participant Profile

Mark Peacock

Associate Professor
Department of Social Sciences at York University

Mark Peacock is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Sciences at York University. In 1996, he completed his Ph.D in Economics and Politics at Wolfston College, University of Cambridge. He then moved to Germany and lived in Berlin before taking up university appointment at Witten/Herdecke and Erfurt. Peacock moved to York in 2006 and became associated with the Business & Society undergraduate programme and the Social and Political Thought graduate programme. Recently He has contributed to the revival and development of the “Chartalist” theory of money and is regularly published in various economic journals including the Cambridge Journal of Economics, Journal of Institutional Economics, and the Journal of Economic Issues.

Participant Profile

Mathew Forstater

Professor of Economics
University of Missouri-Kansas City

Mathew Forstater is a Professor of Economics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Director of the Center for Full Employment and Price Stability (C-FEPS) and a Research Associate of the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. Forstater received his Ph.D. in Economics from the New School for Social Research, under the supervision of Robert Heilbroner, author of The Worldly Philosophers. Forstater has published widely on the Employment Policy, Political Economy, and the History of Economic Thought. He is an affiliated faculty member of the Missouri Institute for Public Policy and an Associate of Columbia University Seminars.

Participant Profile

Josh Ryan-Collins

Economist
New Economics Foundation

Josh Ryan-Collins joined the New Economics Foundation in 2006 and works in the Finance and Business team, leading work on monetary reform. He is the lead author of nef’s recently published guide to the UK monetary system - Where does money come from? - which sets out in non-technical language how commercial banks dominate the creation and allocation of credit and money. You can find Josh blogging at New Economics Foundation and on Twitter.

Moderator: 
Participant Profile

Keith Hart

Centennial Professor of Economic Anthropology
Departments of International Development and Anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science

Keith Hart is Centennial Professor of Economic Anthropology, Departments of International Development and Anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science. He is also co-director of the Human Economy Programme, Centre for the Advancement of Scholarship, University of Pretoria. Keith has taught at numerous universities, for the longest time at Cambridge, where he was Director of the African Studies Centre. He contributed the idea of an informal economy to Development Studies and has written extensively on money. His recent books include The Human Economy (2010) and Economic Anthropology (2011).

Resources